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    Easter Still Matters

    When Leslie Newbigin served as the Bishop of Madras, India, visiting pastors, theologians and denominational leaders rang at his door for a meeting with the intellectual and pastoral star of the ecumenical movement, before catching their flight home. Newbigin’s home was conveniently on the way to the airport, which only increased traffic. He graciously invited in the unsolicited visitors for tea despite his busy schedule. Many guests inevitably asked him for his opinion on the still toddler-aged Church of South India – an ecumenical church formed in 1947 from several Protestant churches and of which Newbigin played a vital role and had been appointed as one of its first bishops…

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    Resurrection as a Historical Event

    Easter is the day that 2.3 billion Christians (32 percent of human population) will declare that two centuries ago, a Galilean rose from the dead three days after he was crucified by Pontius Pilate. Resurrection is the founding faith statement of Christianity. Christmas did not birth Christianity, a naive understanding of that religion, but Easter. Without Easter there is no Christianity. In fact, Christians celebrated Easter from the start on a weekly basis. They went to synagogues on Saturday — first Christians were Jews — then broke bread on Sunday mornings because it was on the dawn of the first day of the week that the first witnesses found the…

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    Resurrection is not a Metaphor

      “Easter still matters, but as a recurrent energy of emergence detached completely from the thought or imagining in mind of Jesus’s intervention in history. That’s shriveled and puny.” -W.S. Di Piero, essayist and poet. If not for the resurrection, the four gospel writers would not have bothered to tell the story of Christ. But do we really know what that implies? It means that everything about the story of Christ can only be understood in the sunlight of the resurrection. Which also means that everything about our story, the life of pursuing Christ, can only be seen as the projection of that resurrection. But to what depth have we…

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    Paradox of Resurrection

    v 32 “When they heard Paul speak about the resurrection of the dead, some laughed in contempt, but others said, ‘We want to hear more about this later.'” To the Greeks, the idea of bodily resurrection was a ridiculous idea. Either all we have is this material world and nothing more or if there was anything after this life, it was the freedom from this material world into the world of spirit and ideas. What they found funny was why anyone would want this body again. There was a severe distaste of the human body and all its bodily functions. The Christian resurrection that though this material world is not…